Riverfest

Riverfest

Riverfest August 6, 2022 The town of Brattleboro exists within the Connecticut River watershed. The West River and Whetstone Brook feed into the Connecticut and, together, they have supported communities of people for centuries. As part of the Connecticut River...

How Did Flatboats Work?

How Did Flatboats Work?

This week in Brattleboro history we are going to focus on early trade and transportation.  Before interstate highways and train rails there was the Connecticut River.  The Abenaki used the river to trade tools and goods throughout New England.   When Europeans arrived...

Log Drives

Log Drives

In March of 1916 the Brattleboro Reformer ran an article explaining that the great Connecticut River log drives that had impacted our region since 1869 were done.  For 45 years the river towns witnessed log drives that began in late March and ended in early...

Development and Indigenous Burials

Development and Indigenous Burials

In 1922 the business community was pretty excited.  Companies along Vernon Road were having a great deal of success.  The White River Chair Company, Crosby Milling and Fort Dummer Cotton Mill had all settled into the southeast corner of town and caused a housing boom....

Bridges and Floods

Bridges and Floods

In 1889 a “remarkably strong and substantial” suspension bridge was built across the Connecticut River to connect Brattleboro with Chesterfield, NH.  It was the culmination of a series of negotiations designed to improve east/west transportation between Brattleboro,...

Steamboats and Connecticut River

Steamboats and Connecticut River

Gravestone epitaphs have led us on interesting journeys. At Prospect Hill Cemetery there is a stone that overlooks the Connecticut River. Carved on one side is the following; “The grave of Alanson D. Wood, who was killed instantly on this river by the explosion of the Steamboat Greenfield, May 18, 1840, age 30.”